The bridge between failure and success

by Admin on April 18, 2013

Rather than stats, sectionals or form analysis this week I’d like to discuss two absolutely essential personal traits required if you are to succeed as a punter.

They can teach you lessons the hard way, but will help you achieve the results you want.

They can make you disappointed or angry, but you’ll be a better punter because of them.

I am talking about honesty and discipline.

Discipline is the bridge between your punting goals and achieving them. But without honesty you won’t even be able to find the bridge in the first place.

Most punters who suffer through another losing run blame their results on bad luck, or pass the blame on to somebody or something else. Obviously that is a far easier option than being brutally honest about your results and taking complete ownership of them.

The fact is your betting balance right now is a direct reflection of every decision you have made and every action you have taken. No doubt luck plays a factor in the short run, but over the long term as a punter you get exactly what you deserve. Nothing more and nothing less.

So it is essential that you take personal responsibility for your results and realise that there is no ‘perfect time’ to make the changes necessary to achieve better results. Just get started and understand that you are the only person that can get your results where you want them to be.

“Things don’t change, we change.”

“The best thing you can do is the right thing. The next best thing you can do is the wrong thing. The worst thing you can do is nothing.”

“A year from now you will wish you had started today.”

Once you have accepted the ultimate responsibility for your results, it becomes very clear that it is up to you to improve and optimise all aspects of your betting. Consider it a fantastic opportunity to get better. Because you shouldn’t think that successful punters were born with an innate winning gift. Rather they all achieve success by being driven, detail oriented, disciplined contrarians.

So before you place your next bet I challenge you to complete an audit of your punting approach as the first step in taking responsibility for fixing it. Going from losing to winning starts with accepting full responsibility for the position you are currently in. Ownership also means you will be able to accept responsibility for the eventual success that will come your way.

  • What is my profit or loss over the last 12 or 24 months?
  • Am I focused on finding value or just backing winners at any price?
  • Am I easily led by anyone with an opinion?
  • Do I have a strong grasp of odds, percentages and variance?
  • Do I put time into finding the best available odds?
  • Do I have a staking plan?
  • Will I stick with a proven approach during a losing run?
  • Do I keep a spreadsheet recording all my bets?

Identify any and all aspects where you can get better and consider just focusing on one thing at a time. Once you have done that move onto the next part of your plan.

Any punter can change if they really want to. I actually see it on a regular basis as I get to work with punters who have known nothing but losing for their entire punting life. But many find that if they fully commit to being honest with themselves and employing discipline during good times and bad (it is just as important during peaks as it is during troughs), the results take care of themselves.

That may sound a little less exciting than what the thrill-seeking punter typically craves, but all will assure you that winning consistently is anything but boring. And the ‘pain’ of discipline is far less than the pain of continually losing.

So here is a challenge for you today. Leave a comment on our blog with the number one aspect of your betting approach that you will start to fix immediately.

And if there’s anything at all that you feel we can help with, just let us know.

Good punting
David Duffield

{ 3 comments… read them below or add one }

David April 19, 2013 at 4:17 pm

“And the ‘pain’ of discipline far exceeds the pain of continually losing.”

That doesn’t sound right.

Reply

David April 19, 2013 at 5:08 pm

Spot on David I meant to say “And the ‘pain’ of discipline is far less than the pain of continually losing.”

Will edit it now.

Reply

chjohn April 20, 2013 at 8:46 am

This bloke was a poker gambling legend in the United States and would bet on anhthing where he had an advantage.
Puggy Pearson made it a little pithier when he said, his line was, “There ain’t only three things to gambl
ing. Knowing the 60/40 end of a proposition, money management, and knowing yourself.”"

Reply

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